Amanita muscaria ancient folklore traditions

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Think of an illustration of elves or fairy elves, or under a poisonous mushroom, and it’s very likely that the tip of the mushroom with the white spots is bright red. Preparation care and rituals were prominent. The Celtic Druids, for example, purified themselves by fasting and meditating for three days and drinking only water. to ingest the fungus, after which others drank its urine for its entheogenic effects. Although it sounds decidedly unpleasant to modern ears, if the shaman had been fasting, the urine would have been mostly water, containing the hallucinogenic compounds. The body first absorbs the hallucinogenic mushroom from the fly agaric, then excretes the toxins from the stomach. The hallucinogenic chemicals then act on the body and are excreted unchanged in the urine. Northern European reindeer are also attracted to the euphoric effects of the fly agaric and Siberians will notice the drunken behavior of these animals and slaughter them for the same effect by eating meat.

Modern research has also shown that the effect of the two active ingredients on the brain can inhibit anxiety and the wheezing reflex. This would support theories that fierce Viking Berserk warriors used the flying mushroom before going into battle, causing uncontrolled anger and courage. what they were famous for.

The mushroom has long been a popular symbol of Christmas and winter celebrations in Central Europe, and you can buy amanita muscaria canada. It is found on Christmas cards and as a decorative replica for trees and wreaths. Our current concept of Santa Claus can be traced back to an amalgamation of several characters from European folklore, such as: B. a more pagan Scandinavian goblin who offers protection from evil spirits in exchange for a winter feast, and the Byzantine Archbishop of the 4th century which became Saint-Pierre. Nicholas and was famous for his kindness to children. More recently, it has been suggested that Siberian use of the fly agaric may also have played a role in the development of the Santa Claus legend. At the winter solstice, the shaman entered the yurt through the smoke hole and descended from the central birch pole, carrying many dried mushrooms. one would have thought that the shaman could fly alone or with the help of the reindeer, who also knew the taste of the poisonous mushroom. Santa now wears the same color as the poisonous mushroom, carries a bag of special goodies, walks back and forth by the fireplace, can fly with reindeer, and lives in the “far north”.

HousingServices.ca was not involved in the creation of this content. Information contained on this page is provided by an independent third-party content provider. HousingServices.ca makes no warranties or representations in connection therewith.